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Congratulations to SCIO’s summer 2019 prizewinners

SCIO is pleased to announce the Oxford Summer Programme 2019 prizewinners.

The SCIO alumni prize, awarded for the first time in Michaelmas Term 2018, is funded from contributions from SCIO alumni of programmes over the past 15 years. The prize is awarded to one student each term or programme for overall outstanding academic performance.

The de Jager prize is awarded in recognition of written work, submitted by each awardee during the Oxford Summer Programme, which is judged to be outstanding. Presented by SCIO at the close of each term, the award is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each awardee reflects their enduring commitment to academic excellence.

The prizewinners for OSP 2019, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

The students reflect on their time with SCIO:
If any student suspects they might be interested in academia for a living, then studying abroad in Oxford is a good way to discern one’s vocation. The classes were a great place to examine ideas in creative ways, and the tutors struck an excellent balance between guiding my studies and giving me the freedom to explore topics I find personally meaningful. Each tutor provided the perfect amount of challenge to allow students to flourish, and the classes sparked good conversations and intriguing questions, both inside and outside the classroom. The recent canonization of John Henry Newman has also rekindled my thankfulness at the opportunity to explore the same spaces as so many important figures throughout academic history. Being in Oxford is a great reminder that academia is a communal endeavour spanning thousands of years, and we have the opportunity of entering into this ever-evolving endeavour, not as isolated individuals batting around ideas in ivory towers, but [...]

By |November 11th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

SCIO and the CCCU tour acclaimed Mr Darwin’s Tree play

The acclaimed British one-man play, Mr Darwin’s Tree, is currently on tour on campuses in North America. Produced by Scholarship and Christianity in Oxford (SCIO), the UK Centre of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU), and underwritten by the Templeton Religion Trust and The Blankemeyer Foundation, the play explores the life and work of Charles Darwin within the contexts of science, faith, and family.

Mr Darwin’s Tree, written and directed by playwright Murray Watts and featuring actor Andrew Harrison, is being performed at eleven institutions this autumn. The first part of the tour concluded in early October and included: Eastern University, Calvin University, Lubbock Christian University, Trinity Christian College, Bethel University, Northwestern College, IA, and Seattle Pacific University.

The thought-provoking play was appreciated by staff and students alike:
“I really enjoyed watching this production of Mr. Darwin’s Tree. In my church and family (at least for the most part), it’s always been argued that Christians can’t believe in evolution, but the more I think about it, the more I question the reasoning behind that claim. This play made me think and will continue to make me think in the days and weeks ahead as I too try to discern truth about science and faith.”
 
‘I went into that play not knowing what I was going to see and to be honest, with a little bit of a bad attitude. I was tired and did not want to see it. Although, when the play started, my attitude changed. The play was very intriguing and interesting. I did not know how much Darwin struggled with his theory of evolution and natural selection. Overall, I was very impressed with the play and thank you for giving [...]

By |October 21st, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Congratulations to SCIO’s spring 2019 de Jager prizewinners

SCIO is pleased to announce the spring 2019 de Jager and SCIO alumni prize winners.

The de Jager prize for the British culture and undergraduate research seminar is awarded in recognition of outstanding scholarly work submitted by each awardee during the Scholars’ Semester in Oxford in the British culture and undergraduate research seminar courses. Awarded at the close of each term, the de Jager prize is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each prize winner is reflective of their longstanding commitment to academic excellence.

The SCIO alumni prize, awarded for the first time in Michaelmas Term 2018, is funded from contributions from SCIO alumni of programmes over the past 15 years. The prize is awarded to one student each term or programme for overall outstanding academic performance.

The prize winners for Hilary Term 2019, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

 

Two students reflect on their time on the programme:
The SCIO program gave me the unique opportunity of going deeper into the professional world of my discipline. Both the SCIO staff and the Oxford faculty they connected me with offered their energy and expertise to challenge, train, and equip me to face the often daunting task of scholarship. The program staff provided an environment for my technical skills and academic curiosities to be fostered and expanded beyond that which was possible for me before going.

Jensen Kirkendall 
 

Both the city and institution of Oxford provide a vibrancy and appreciation for thought. Ironically, despite the everyday hustle and bustle, Oxford provided me an opportunity to slow down and think. I not only had the time to inquire and respond to questions, I was tutored on what questions to ask and why. While I expected [...]

By |September 24th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Mr. Darwin’s Tree, the acclaimed one-man play, to tour US Christian colleges in 2019

 

Mr. Darwin’s Tree, the acclaimed British one-man play about the life and work of Charles Darwin, will tour 11 North American Christian college campuses in 2019. Produced by SCIO, and underwritten by Templeton Religion Trust, and The Blankemeyer Foundation the tour aims to strengthen the educational environment on CCCU campuses by enhancing the conversation on science and religion.

Written by noted playwright and director Murray Watts (The Miracle Maker, KJB: The Book that Changed the World, The Dream) and starring leading British film, TV, and theatre actor Andrew Harrison (Dorian Gray, Miss Marple, Beyond Narnia), Mr. Darwin’s Tree presents a very human and very real Charles Darwin, one who wrestled with the challenges that his theories posed for traditional beliefs. It also presents Darwin’s wife, Emma, as an intelligent and articulate representative of Christian faith. In doing so, the play rejects the ‘straw man’ effigies of Darwin presented by both his extreme protagonists and antagonists, providing the opportunity for lively engagement, thoughtful conversations, and fresh explorations.
‘Discussing creation and evolution in abstract terms often leads to polarized and emotional debates,’ said SCIO Executive Director and Bridging the Two Cultures of Science and the Humanities Project Director, Dr Stan Rosenberg. ‘Seeing these issues in their historical context and connected to real people, by contrast, helps us to understand the complexity of the issues and to discuss them in more nuanced and less confrontational ways.’
Hailed for packing in ‘a great deal of history and fascinating insight [thanks to] the show’s 75-minute bravura performance by solo actor Andrew Harrison’ (Christian Today) and acclaimed as ‘an elegantly conceived, clever and highly informative performance, overflowing with gentle humour and charm (Three Weeks Magazine, Edinburgh), the tour will mark the play’s [...]

Life after SCIO: alumna studying for a PhD at Princeton

We are very pleased that our alumna Abigail M. Sargent is studying for a PhD in Medieval History at Princeton.

Having grown up in East Barre, Vermont, Abigail studied history at Gordon College. She graduated in 2009 and then completed a MA in Medieval Studies at Fordham University. She explains that her time in Oxford with SCIO inspired her current PhD studies:

My year at Oxford with SCIO in 2011-12 had helped cement the Middle Ages as my particular corner of history; I still remember the sudden immediacy of the Anglo-Saxon period when I sat in my tutor’s office as he explained how I could walk out his door and follow the course of the medieval town wall.’

Besides encouraging her academic discipline, the spiritual side of scholarship that SCIO offers also helped her:

SCIO also helped shape my vision of what faithful scholarship could look like, in all senses of the term, and in settings beyond the Christian liberal arts college. Right now I’m living one version of that life as I work on my PhD at Princeton. At the moment I’m in Europe doing archival research for my dissertation. I spend my days sifting through abbreviated French and Latin documents, trying to detect when and how people in fourteenth-century rural communities acted as groups to fulfil external demands and to resist external pressures on what they saw as their rights and privileges.

Her future ambition is to teach medieval history, with a particular focus on ‘ordinary’ people’s lives, which she considers important to both our professional and private lives.

Congratulations to SCIO’s fall 2018 prize winners

SCIO is pleased to announce the fall 2018 de Jager and SCIO alumni prize winners.

The de Jager prize for the British culture and undergraduate research seminar is awarded in recognition of outstanding scholarly work submitted by each awardee during the Scholars’ Semester in Oxford in the British culture and undergraduate research seminar courses. Awarded at the close of each term, the de Jager prize is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each prize winner is reflective of their longstanding commitment to academic excellence.

The SCIO alumni prize, awarded for the first time in Michaelmas Term 2018, is funded from contributions from SCIO alumni of programmes over the past 15 years. The prize is awarded to one student each term or programme for overall outstanding academic performance.

The prize winners for Michaelmas Term 2018, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

Two students reflect on their time on the programme:
At Oxford, I was able to establish myself as an independent thinker within my discipline. Because all learning was accomplished through self-propelled research and writing, I was enabled to approach my education with unprecedented depth, as opposed to the broad survey-based approach undertaken by most American universities. The tutorials, though demanding and somewhat intimidating, end up feeling like a conversational dance between the tutor and tutee as they attempt to locate and grasp truth and value. If you are on the fence about applying for the SSO program, I encourage you to take the plunge. It will be the most academically challenging four months of your collegiate career, but you will seldom feel more accomplished than when you send in that final seminar essay.

David Kraus

What a delightful and strenuous adventure it was in [...]

By |March 27th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

SCIO hosts North American colloquium for Bridging the Two Cultures of Science and the Humanities

Over the weekend of 15–17 February 2019, SCIO hosted The North American Colloquium in St Petersburg, Florida. This was an event of the Bridging the Two Cultures of Science and the Humanities project funded by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Blankemeyer Foundation.

The colloquium brought together 32 faculty members and over 40 of their senior academic officers, campus ministers, and student development officers from 20 institutions to discuss strategies for impacting science and religion dialogues on their campuses. Through plenary talks, panel sessions, workshops, and breakouts groups, participants explored how they could partner together to maximize the long-term, sustainable impact of science and religion discussions among students, faculty, and administrators on campus.

Highlights of the weekend included plenary talks given by Dr April Maskiewicz Cordero (Point Loma Nazarene University) and Dr Jonathan Hill (Calvin College), a video lecture by Professor Alister McGrath (University of Oxford), and a performance by Andrew Harrison of the one-man play, Mr. Darwin’s Tree (written and directed by Murray Watts). The group was also led in worship on Sunday morning by Dr Bill Van Groningen (Trinity Christian College) and Dr Todd Pickett (Biola University). For details about the talks and sessions, please see the colloquium schedule.

By |March 20th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Congratulations to SCIO’s summer 2018 de Jager prizewinners

SCIO is pleased to announce the Oxford Summer Programme 2018 de Jager prizewinners.

The de Jager prize is awarded in recognition of written work, submitted by each awardee during the Oxford Summer Programme, which is judged to be outstanding. Presented by SCIO at the close of each term, the award is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each awardee reflects their enduring commitment to academic excellence.

The prizewinners for OSP 2018, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

The students reflect on their time with SCIO:
To study in Oxford is to be saturated by an enriching environment that exudes the magic of learning. The atmosphere offers limitless encouragement to those seeking the pursuit of knowledge just for knowledge’s sake. In fact, there is no need to justify the habit of reading and writing for seven to nine hours a day; instead these activities are entrenched in the previous works of enduring authors, such as Oscar Wilde, Albert Einstein, and C.S. Lewis. Therefore, by exploring the various colleges of Merton, where J.R.R. Tolkien taught, or Lady Margaret Hall, where Malala Yousafzi currently studies, one feels a sense of inspiration and achievement. These and countless others are the giants whose past inventions propel future ideas and provide inspiration.

Anneliese Hardman
What was my favorite part of the Oxford Summer Programme? Quite honestly, all of it. The adventure of living another culture as a student rather than as a tourist, the breathtaking weight of history exuding from every stone of Oxford’s awe-inspiring buildings, the reverent awe of worshipping in ancient cathedrals, the thrill of having access to the world-class Bodleian libraries, the empowering satisfaction of completing a daunting research paper, the exhilaration of discussing [...]

By |August 23rd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Congratulations to SCIO’s spring 2018 de Jager prizewinners

SCIO is pleased to announce the spring 2018 de Jager prizewinners.

The de Jager prize is awarded in recognition of outstanding scholarly work, submitted by each awardee during the Scholars’ Semester in Oxford. Awarded at the close of each term, the de Jager prize is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each prize winner is reflective of their long-standing commitment to academic excellence.

The prizewinners for Hilary Term 2018, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

Two students reflect on their time on the programme:
I arrived in Oxford with a hunger to give my ideas, which covered various disciplines (and which did not, as far as I was aware, fit into rigid academic categories), a tangible form. My experience at SCIO and the guidance of my tutors allowed me to expand, sharpen, and focus these ideas and to find new academic contexts and discussions in which to express that about which I cared so much. I now have confidence to apply for doctoral programmes and to carry out studies based on what I wrote with SCIO.  It was incredible to be part of a group where individual visions were nurtured and supported by the fellowship. At Oxford, these ideas grew in both formal and informal settings. Being in a city full of such vibrancy and places of culture and community, discussions spontaneously occurred, accompanied by short walks to local restaurants and pubs. I’ll never forget the excitement and adventurous delight of being at the heart of Oxford surrounded by passionate characters eager to engage with the deeper questions of life and truth.

Nathalia Bell

The Oxford tutorial system has a bipartite attraction: first, it allows the student to research a specific topic that is [...]

By |August 2nd, 2018|News, Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Congratulations to SCIO’s fall 2017 de Jager prizewinners

SCIO is pleased to announce the fall 2017 de Jager prizewinners.

Awarded at the close of each term, the de Jager prizes recognize outstanding scholarly work submitted by each awardee during the Scholars’ Semester in Oxford.  The de Jager prize is facilitated by Geoffrey and Caroline de Jager, whose generous gift to each prizewinner is symptomatic of their abiding commitment to academic excellence.

The prizewinners for Michaelmas Term 2017, along with their sending institutions, are named below.

Two students reflect on their time on the programme:
One of the best things about the Oxford tutorial system is the complete freedom to pursue things that interest you. While I love English literature, I like combining it with other disciplines such as psychology, history, and gender and sexuality studies. This was something I was able to do within the parameters of my tutorials, and to a greater extent through the seminar paper I wrote at the end of term. My tutors did a great job of allowing me to pursue interesting lines of research while also suggesting further resources and ways to better both my actual essays and my base of knowledge in the area I was studying. As well as gaining knowledge in my subject, I’ve become a better researcher and a better writer.

Katie Steininger

I believe it is no exaggeration to say that, in becoming part of Oxford for a term, Oxford somehow became a small part of me. The libraries and city streets were spaces that cultivated an atmosphere brimming and shining with life and learning, an instant of existence within which my dear friends and I found ourselves challenged, inspired, and enlarged. My ability and confidence as a scholar, in all the fullness of that idea, [...]

By |April 27th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments|